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Materia: Jameelah Morris & Reagan Ross

Events

Speaker:

Jameelah Morris (Anthropology, Stanford) and Reagan Ross (Communication, Stanford)

Date:

Thursday, May 13, 2021 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Location:

Online

Type:

Discussion

Materia: Jameelah Morris & Reagan Ross

 
We are pleased to announce that our next gathering will feature Jameelah Morris (Anthropology, Stanford) and Reagan Ross (Communication, Stanford).

Our guest speakers have kindly shared the following description of their talks: 

Jameelah Morris (PhD Candidate, Anthropology, Stanford) - "No innocence to be found: On Gendered Anti-black Violence against Black Youth"
In this presentation, I ask how gendered-racialized police violence against young Black people scaffolds the production of Cartagena as Colombia’s “paradise”.  I examine how anti-black state violence frustrates normative expectations of genealogical time and how Black youth-led political mobilizations critically problematize "innocence” as both a legitimizing logic of antiblackness and  a constitutive feature of discourses of "the child."

Reagan Ross (PhD Candidate, Communication, Stanford) - "Righteous Judge: Coercive Court" 
During this brief presentation, I will detail the results of an ethnographic study of the behavior of a problem-solving court judge in a California court. Observations of courtroom interactions and interviews with authority figures in the court, including the judge, show that while the judge’s performance often aligns with the principles of therapeutic jurisprudence, said judge also presents himself as benevolent or stern depending on whether or not he’s speaking with an "ideal" or a "problem" participant. Literature on therapeutic justice addresses coercion within problem-solving courts as necessary to increase compliance with court requirements. The findings presented in this talk will demonstrate that the judge’s performance on the problem-solving court stage contributes to the coercive nature of the court.

In preparation for the meeting, speakers have suggested that attendees peruse the following article: Maria Ximena Abello-Hurtado-Mandinga, "Black Girl Bodies: Notes on the Legacy of Colonialism in South America and the Urgency of a Black Liberation Project for Black Girls," The Black Scholar 50.4 (2020): 18-29.

Register in advance to receive Zoom details.