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Slavic Acting Assistant Professor Job Opportunity

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Slavic Acting Assistant Professor Job Opportunity

Mar 23, 2021

The department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Stanford University is seeking applications for an acting assistant professor in the primary area of Russian literature and culture. The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is part of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, a consortium of departments that collaborate on curricular and research initiatives. The primary specialization is in the 20th century; candidates with training in other disciplines, other subfields or periods, and other languages, including other Slavic languages, are encouraged to apply. This position will be for one year, renewable for up to three years total. We anticipate a start date of September 1, 2021.

Candidates must demonstrate strong scholarship and excellence in teaching. Near-native fluency in Russian and English is required. The candidate will be expected to teach four courses per year.

Application materials must be submitted online via https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/18347. In order to be considered for this position, you must submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, three confidential letters of recommendation, writing sample, teaching statement, and a brief statement of research interests (no more than three pages) and teaching evaluations (if available). For full consideration, please transmit all materials by April 7, 2021.

Stanford is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Stanford welcomes applications from all who would bring additional dimensions to the University’s research, teaching and clinical missions. The Slavic Department strongly welcomes applications from candidates who would enhance our faculty’s diversity, whether that is understood in relation to the United States or the region about which we teach.