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Chelsea Elzinga

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Chelsea Elzinga

Chelsea Elzinga is a second-year doctoral student of French at Stanford University. Her research examines the senses (particularly the olfactory) in Francophone literature, art, and culture. Chelsea’s interest in sensory studies has led to research areas as varied as the lexicon of smell in the novels of the French Caribbean, religious sensory markers in French-Tunisian cinema, and literature of the medieval feast. She is currently teaching the introductory French language sequence at Stanford and developing a pedagogical approach to teaching culture in the language classroom through the senses.  
 
Chelsea received her M.A. in French Literature at Florida State University where she wrote her thesis on the sense of smell in Samuel Beckett’s novel, Molloy. While completing her master’s degree, Chelsea taught courses covering all levels of the elementary French language sequence. She also presented work at several international conferences including the International Colloquium for 20th and 21st Century French and Francophone Studies where she gave her paper, “A Revolution in the Sensorium: La Galerie tactile du Louvre and the Politics of Intersensorial Engagement.” 
 
Chelsea received her B.A. in Art History and French from Seattle Pacific University. Her honors thesis explored urban isolation, the body, and gender identity within the oeuvres of contemporary French and American artists, Annette Messager and Nancy Spero. 
 
Before arriving at Stanford, Chelsea spent a year in Luxembourg as a Fulbright grantee where she taught English and French to multi-lingual students. As a doctoral student, Chelsea plans to pursue questions at the root of her research: How are sensory phenomena expressed in literature, film, and culture? 

Education

M.A., French Literature, Florida State University 
B.A., Art History, Seattle Pacific University
B.A., French, Seattle Pacific Univeristy