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Chloe Summers Edmondson

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Chloe Summers Edmondson

Chloe Edmondson is a Ph.D. candidate in the French department. Her research is situated at the crossroads of literary criticism, cultural history, and media studies. She specializes in 17th and 18th-century France, with a particulary focus on letter-writing practices. She has also worked extensively in the field of Digital Humanities. Chloe is co-project lead on the "Salons Project" with Melanie Conroy, a project under the umbrella of "Mapping the Republic of Letters." She completed the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities offered through CESTA, the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Modern History and Digital Humanities Quarterly, and most recently she co-edited a volume with Dan Edelstein, entitled Networks of European Enlightenment, with Oxford Studies in the Enlightenment.
 
Previously she earned a B.A. with Honors and Distinction in French, and an M.A. in Communication and Media Studies, both at Stanford. Chloe wrote an Honors Thesis entitled “Between Sociability and Literature: Female Authorship in Enlightenment and Post-Revolutionary France” under her advisor Professor Dan Edelstein, which demonstrates how practices of sociability in the High Enlightenment afforded women both socio-cultural and literary influence into the 19th century, through studies of Julie de Lespinasse, Madame de Genlis, and Madame de Staël. In Communication, her MA thesis, “The Rebirth of Exteriority: The Socio-Visual Circulation of the Self in the 19th century and Today” under Professor Fred Turner, compares practices of vernacular photography in the nineteenth century to the practices we see today on Instagram, examining the impacts of this socio-visual culture on processes of self-fashioning. 
 
 
 

Education

Ph.D. French (expected 2020)
M.A., Communication with concentration in Media Studies, Stanford (2014)
B.A., French, with Honors, with Distinction, Stanford (2014)