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Cintia Santana

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csantana@stanford.edu

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Cintia Santana

Senior Lecturer in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages

Adviser, Translation Minor

Cintia Santana specializes in 19th and 20th Century Spanish literature, particularly in the cultural relationships between Spain and the United States. Her research interests include transatlantic and translation studies, representations of immigration in contemporary Spanish literature, and the theory and praxis of the Latin American and Spanish short story. Her book, Forth and Back: Translation, Dirty Realism, and the Spanish Novel (1975-1995), was published by Bucknell University Press in 2013. Her short stories and poems have appeared in, or are forthcoming from Anti-, Beloit Poetry Journal, Iron Horse Review, Linebreak, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Missouri Review, Pleiades, RHINO, Spillway, The Spoon River Poetry Review, and The Threepenny Review. Her poem, "Qasida of Grief," was chosen by C.D. Wright as the winner of The Sycamore Review’s 2013 Wabash Poetry Prize. 

Education

B.A. University of California, Davis

M.F.A. Sarah Lawrence College

Ph.D. Harvard University

COURSES

ILAC 116 Approaches to Spanish and Spanish American Literature

Short stories, poetry, and theater. What analytical tools do the "grammars" of different genres call for? What contact zones exist between these genres? How have ideologies, the power of patronage, and shifting poetics shaped their production over time? Authors may include Arrabal, Borges, Cortázar, Cernuda,García Márquez, Lorca, Neruda, Rivas. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 241 Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.

ILAC 130 Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.

DLCL 293 Literary Translation (ENGLISH 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.

ILAC 242 Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poetry) and formal elements of poetry (e.g. meter, rhythm, rhetorical figures, and tropes). Students write original poems over the course of the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Authors include Dari­o, Machado, Jimenez, Vallejo, Huidobro, Salinas, Pales Matos, Lorca, Aleixandre, Cernuda, Neruda, Girondo. Course is offered every other year. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course taught in Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10 students.

ILAC 111Q Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.

PUBLICATIONS