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Gabriella Safran

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Building 260, Room 109
Phone: 650 723 4414
gsafran@stanford.edu

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On leave 2015-2016; meeting by appointment

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Realism
folklore
Jewish Studies
Yiddish
Polish
Russian
20th century
19th century

Gabriella Safran

Eva Chernov Lokey Professor in Jewish Studies, Professor and Director, Slavic Languages and Literatures,
Chair, Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages

 

Gabriella Safran has written on Russian, Polish, Yiddish, and French literatures and cultures.  Her most recent book, Wandering Soul:  The Dybbuk's Creator, S. An-sky (Harvard, 2010), is a biography of an early-twentieth-century Russian-Yiddish writer who was also an ethnographer, a revolutionary, and a wartime relief worker. 

Safran teaches and writes on Russian literature, Yiddish literature, folklore, and folkloristics.  She is now working on two monograph projects: one on the collection and curating of the Russian peasant voice, by writers, lexicographers, ethnographers, and musicologists, from the 1830s to the 1910s, and the other on the popularization of notions of Jewish voice, by writers, speakers, and performers, in the Russian space and in the United States, from the 1870s through the 1920s. 

Education

Ph.D., Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University, 1998.
B.A., magna cum laude, with honors in Soviet and East European Studies, Yale University, 1990.

COURSES

SLAVIC 369 Folklore Theory and Slavic Folklore

Why do educated elites care about popular or folk culture, and how do they use it? An intellectual history of two centuries of folklore theory, with examples drawn from Eastern European (Slavic and Jewish) lore; students collect other folklore themselves and analyze it. Separate section for Russian readers.

SLAVIC 325 Readings in Russian Realism

For graduate students or upper-level undergraduates. What did Realism mean for late imperial Russian writers? What has it meant for twentieth-century literary theory? As we seek to answer these questions, we read Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, and Chekhov, alongside their brilliant but less often taught contemporaries such as Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, Leskov, Garshin, Korolenko, Gorky, Andreev, and Bunin. Taught in English; readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian.

SLAVIC 300B Research Tools and Professionalization Workshop

This course introduces graduate students in Slavic Studies to library, archival, and web resources for research, grant opportunities, publication strategies, and professional timelines. Open to PhD students in the Slavic Department and other departments and to MA students in CREEES.

SLAVIC 398 Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 148, JEWISHST 348, SLAVIC 198)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.

SLAVIC 198 Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 148, JEWISHST 348, SLAVIC 398)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.