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Kathryn Starkey

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Contact:

Pigott Hall 107
650 724 3622
starkey@stanford.edu

Office Hours:

Autumn Quarter 2014: Thursdays 1-3pm or by appointment

Research Groups:

User is not a member of any group.

Affinity links:

medieval and early modern literature
Medieval literature and visual culture (the gothiccathedral)
medieval literature
German literature
visual culture
history of the book
Gender and Sexuality

Kathryn Starkey

Professor of German Studies

Co-Director of the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS)
Chair of Graduate Studies, Department of German Studies

Kathryn Starkey is Professor of German in the Department of German Studies. Her primary research interests are medieval and early modern German literature and culture with an emphasis on visuality, material culture, language, performativity, and the history of the book.

She is the author of Reading the Medieval Book: Word, Image, and Performance in Wolfram von Eschenbach’s “Willehalm” (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2004), and A Courtier’s Mirror: Cultivating Elite Identity in Thomasin's "Welscher Gast" (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2013). With Horst Wenzel (Humboldt University, Berlin), Professor Starkey has co-edited Imagination und Deixis: Studien zur Wahrnehmung im Mittelalter (Stuttgart: Hirzel, 2007), and Visual Culture and the German Middle Ages (New York: Palgrave Press, 2005). Together with Ann Marie Rasmussen (Duke) and Jutta Eming (Freie Universität, Berlin), she conducted a three-year research project funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation TransCoop Program on “Tristan and Isolde and Cultures of Emotion in the Middle Ages.” This project culminated in the co-edited volume Visuality and Materiality in the Story of Tristan (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2012). One of her current projects is a co-authored (with Edith Wenzel) edition, translation, and commentary of songs by the medieval poet Neidhart (ca. 1210-1240) entitled Neidhart: Selected Songs from the Riedegger Manuscript. She is currently also working on a monograph on narrative experimentation in medieval German literature.

Prof. Starkey has been the recipient of fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the UNC Institute for the Arts and the Humanities, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Before joining the faculty at Stanford in 2012 she taught in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Education

Ph.D., German Literature and Culture, University of California, Berkeley, 1998

MA., Germanic Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley, 1993

BA Honours, German, Linguistics, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada, 1990

COURSES

DLCL 354A DLCL Film Series: Crime and the City (DLCL 152A)

This DLCL Film Series seeks to explore the various ways in which "Crime and the City" is reflected in different national cinemas in the past 70 years. .Maybe repeat for credit

DLCL 152A DLCL Film Series: Crime and the City (DLCL 354A)

This DLCL Film Series seeks to explore the various ways in which "Crime and the City" is reflected in different national cinemas in the past 70 years. .Maybe repeat for credit

GERMAN 320 German Literature 1: How Stories are Told (ca. 1170-1600) (GERMAN 220)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.1170 to 1600. Genres include heroic epic, romance, lyric poetry, and mysticism as well as the popular literary forms characteristic of Reformation culture. We will pay special attention to the changing strategies of storytelling across time, genre, and medium. Discussion in English. All texts are available in modern German or English translation. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 320 for 5 or 8 units.

GERMAN 220 German Literature 1: How Stories are Told (ca. 1170-1600) (GERMAN 320)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.1170 to 1600. Genres include heroic epic, romance, lyric poetry, and mysticism as well as the popular literary forms characteristic of Reformation culture. We will pay special attention to the changing strategies of storytelling across time, genre, and medium. Discussion in English. All texts are available in modern German or English translation. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 320 for 5 or 8 units.

GERMAN 397 Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English.

GERMAN 320 Medieval and Early Modern German Literature (GERMAN 220)

This seminar offers a survey of literary, cultural and intellectual developments in German-speaking lands from ca.1200 to 1600. We will begin our investigation with a sampling of medieval heroic epic, romance, lyric poetry, and mysticism. From there we will move into humanism and consider the invention of print and the popular literary forms characteristic of Reformation culture in the German lands. Discussion in English. All texts are available in modern German or English translation. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 320 for 8 units.

GERMAN 220 Medieval and Early Modern German Literature (GERMAN 320)

This seminar offers a survey of literary, cultural and intellectual developments in German-speaking lands from ca.1200 to 1600. We will begin our investigation with a sampling of medieval heroic epic, romance, lyric poetry, and mysticism. From there we will move into humanism and consider the invention of print and the popular literary forms characteristic of Reformation culture in the German lands. Discussion in English. All texts are available in modern German or English translation. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 320 for 8 units.

GERMAN 131 What is German Literature?

This course covers material from the fairy tales of German romanticism, expressionist poetry and painting, literary responses to Nazi Germany and reflections on a unified Germany. Exploring the shifting relationships between cultural aesthetics, entertainment, historical context, and "what is German" we will cover roughly 250 years of literary and artistic production, social and political upheavals, as well as the lives of numerous authors, both male and female. Taught in German.

GERMAN 298 Writing Workshop

Open only to German majors and to students working on special projects, including written reports for internships. Honors students use this number for the honors essay. May be repeated for credit.