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Lazar Fleishman

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Building 240, Room 106
Phone: 650 725 0005
lazar.fleishman@stanford.edu

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Tuesdays and THursdays 1:45-2:45 and By Appointment. Please email me ahead of time to secure a spot.

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Russian émigré literature
Russian modernism
literary theory
Poetics
Pasternak
Pushkin

Lazar Fleishman

Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Chair of Graduate Studies, Slavic Languages and Literatures

Lazar Fleishman studied at a music school and the Music Academy in Riga, Latvia before graduating from Latvian State University in 1966. His first scholarly papers (on Pushkin, the Russian elegy, and Boris Pasternak) were published during his university years.  He emigrated to Israel in 1974, where his academic career began at the Department for Russian Studies and the Department of Comparative Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was co-founder and co-editor of the series Slavica Hierosolymitana: Slavic Studies of Hebrew University (1977-1984). He was Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley (1978-1979; 1980-1981), The University of Texas at Austin (1981-1982), Harvard, and Yale (1984-1985) before joining the Stanford faculty in 1985. He also taught at the Russian State University for the Humanities, Princeton, Latvian State University, Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic), and the University of Vienna, Austria. His research interests encompass the history of 19th and 20th century Russian literature (especially, Pushkin, Pasternak, and Russian modernism); poetics; literary theory; 20th-century Russian history; Russian émigré literature, journalism and culture. He is the founder of the series Stanford Slavic Studies (1987-present), editor of the series Studies in Russian and Slavic Literatures and History (Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2007-present) and co-editor of the series Verbal Art: Studies in Poetics (Fordham, formerly Stanford University Press).

Education

The State University of Tartu and the Latvian State University, Ph.D. (1967-1968)
The Latvian State University, Russian and Slavic Philology (1961-1966, with honors)
The Academy of Music, Riga, USSR (1957-1961)

COURSES

SLAVIC 388 20th century Russian Poetry: From Aleksandr Blok to Joseph Brodsky (SLAVIC 188)

Developments in and 20th-century Russian poetry including symbolism, acmeism, futurism, and literature of the absurd. Emphasis is on close readings of individual poems. Taught in Russian.

SLAVIC 188 20th century Russian Poetry: From Aleksandr Blok to Joseph Brodsky (SLAVIC 388)

Developments in and 20th-century Russian poetry including symbolism, acmeism, futurism, and literature of the absurd. Emphasis is on close readings of individual poems. Taught in Russian.

SLAVIC 345 Age of Experiment: Russian Literature in 1820-1845 (SLAVIC 145)

The course investigates the transition from poetry to prose and the rise of Russian novel and discusses Alexander Pushkin's novel in verse, "Eugene Onegin", his "Tales of Belkin" and "The Captain's Daughter", Mikhail Lermontov's psychological novel, "A Hero of Our Time", and Nikolay Gogol's "Petersburg Tales" and "Dead Souls". Taught in English. Graduate students will have the opportunity to work with texts in original.

SLAVIC 145 Age of Experiment: Russian Literature in 1820-1845 (SLAVIC 345)

The course investigates the transition from poetry to prose and the rise of Russian novel and discusses Alexander Pushkin's novel in verse, "Eugene Onegin", his "Tales of Belkin" and "The Captain's Daughter", Mikhail Lermontov's psychological novel, "A Hero of Our Time", and Nikolay Gogol's "Petersburg Tales" and "Dead Souls". Taught in English. Graduate students will have the opportunity to work with texts in original.

SLAVIC 115 Between Europe and Asia: Introduction to Russian Culture

The course investigates the main stages of Russian history and civilization. Taught in Russian.

SLAVIC 115 Between Europe and Asia: Introduction to Russian Culture

This course offers a short survey of the main stages of the history of Russian statehood from Kievan Rus' to the present, post-Soviet situation. It also covers most important trends in Russian intellectual and religious life, as well as major developments in Russian literature, music, and visual arts from medieval age to 20th century avant-garde, socialist realism and current tendencies in culture. Offered as a part of the "Gateways to the World" program.

SLAVIC 327 Boris Pasternak and 20th century Russian Modernist Poetry

An emphasis is made on close reading of the poetry of Boris Pasternak, Marina Tsvetaeva and Vladimir Mayakovsky. Taught in Russian.

SLAVIC 387 History of 18th and 19th century Russian Poetry (SLAVIC 187)

Close analysis of lyrical poems of Russian classical poets from Mikhail Lomonosov to Vladimir Soloviev. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian

SLAVIC 187 History of 18th and 19th century Russian Poetry (SLAVIC 387)

Close analysis of lyrical poems of Russian classical poets from Mikhail Lomonosov to Vladimir Soloviev. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian

SLAVIC 329 Poetry as System: Introduction to Theory and Practice of Russian Verse (SLAVIC 129)

The history and theory of Russian versification from the 17th to the 20th century. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Russian.

SLAVIC 129 Poetry as System: Introduction to Theory and Practice of Russian Verse (SLAVIC 329)

The history and theory of Russian versification from the 17th to the 20th century. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Russian.

SLAVIC 77Q Russia's Weird Classic: Nikolai Gogol

This seminar investigates the work and life of Nikolai Gogol, the most eccentric of Russian authors, the founder of what was dubbed Fantastic (or Magic) Realism. Our investigation will be based on close reading of the works written in various genres and created in various stages of Gogol's literary career. This study provides a perspective on the relationship between Romanticism and Realism in Russian literature (the so-called "Natural School" of the 1830-1840s), and between the popular Ukrainian culture and "high" Russian and West European traditions in Gogol's oeuvre. The seminar traces Gogol's influences on subsequent Russian literature (Dostoevsky in particular) and investigates the impact of his work on XX century modernist literature, theatre, music, and painting (Vladimir Nabokov, literature of the absurd, Dmitry Shostakovich, Marc Chagall). The seminar is intended for students interested in literature and literary studies.

SLAVIC 77Q Russia's Weird Classic: Nikolai Gogol

Preference to sophomores. An investigation of the works and life of Nikolai Gogol, the most eccentric of Russian authors and the founder of what is dubbed Fantastic Realism. Our investigation will be based on close reading of works written in various genres and created in various stages of Gogol's literary career. Taught in English.

SLAVIC 329 Russian Versification: History and Theory (SLAVIC 129)

A survey of metric forms, rhyming principles and stanzaic patterns in the Russian poetry of the 18th - 21st centuries. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian.

SLAVIC 129 Russian Versification: History and Theory (SLAVIC 329)

A survey of metric forms, rhyming principles and stanzaic patterns in the Russian poetry of the 18th - 21st centuries. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian.

SLAVIC 345 Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment (SLAVIC 145)

This course discusses the transition from predominantly poetic to predominantly prosaic creativity in the Russian literature of the first half of the 19th century Russian literature and the birth of the great Russian novel. It covers three major Russian writers “-- Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Nikolai Gogol -- and examines the changes in the Russian literary scene affected by their work. An emphasis is placed on close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary techniques employed in them. Taught in English.

SLAVIC 145 Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment (SLAVIC 345)

This course discusses the transition from predominantly poetic to predominantly prosaic creativity in the Russian literature of the first half of the 19th century Russian literature and the birth of the great Russian novel. It covers three major Russian writers “-- Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Nikolai Gogol -- and examines the changes in the Russian literary scene affected by their work. An emphasis is placed on close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary techniques employed in them. Taught in English.

PUBLICATIONS