Skip to:

Michael McFaul

People

Focal Groups:

User is not a member of any group.

Research Groups:

User is not a member of any group.

Affinity links:

Michael McFaul

B.A. in International Relations and Slavic languages

M.A. in Slavic and East European studies

Michael McFaul is the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is also an associate professor of political science at Stanford University and a non-resident associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. In 2005, he was appointed director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law.

 
Before joining the Stanford faculty in 1995, he worked for two years as a senior associate for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in residence at the Moscow Carnegie Center.
 
McFaul is also a research associate at the Center for International Security and Arms Control and a senior adviser to the National Democratic Institute. He serves on the Board of directors of the Eurasia Foundation, Firebird Fund, International Forum for Democratic Studies of the National Endowment for Democracy, Institute of Social and Political Studies, Center for Civil Society International, and Institute for Corporate Governance and Law, the steering committee for the Europe and Eurasia division of Human Rights Watch, and the editorial boards of Current History, Journal of Democracy, Demokratizatsiya, and Perspectives on European Politics and Society. He has served as a consultant for numerous companies and government agencies.
 
McFaul's current research interests include democratization in the post-communist world and Iran, U.S.-Russian relations, and American efforts at promoting democracy abroad. With Abbas Milani and Larry Diamond, he co-directs the Hoover project on Iran.
 
McFaul is the author and editor of several monographs including with Kathryn Stoner Weiss, After the Collapse of Communism: Comparative Lessons of Transitions (Cambridge University Press, 2004). With Nikolai Petrov and Andrei Ryabov, Between Dictatorship and Democracy: Russian Post-Communist Political Reform (Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2004); with James Goldgeier, Power and Purpose: American Policy toward Russia after the Cold War (Brookings Institution Press, 2003); with Timothy Colton, Popular Choice and Managed Democracy: The Russian Elections of 1999 and 2000 (Brookings Institution Press, 2003); Russia's Unfinished Revolution: Political Change from Gorbachev to Putin (Cornell University Press, 2001); Russia's 1996 Presidential Election: The End of Bi-Polar Politics, (Hoover Institution Press, 1997); with Tova Perlmutter, Privatization, Conversion and Enterprise Reform in Russia (Westview Press, 1995); Post-Communist Politics: Democratic Prospects in Russia and Eastern Europe (CSIS, 1993); and, with Sergei Markov, The Troubled Birth of Russian Democracy: Political Parties, Programs and Profiles (Hoover Institution Press, 1993). His articles have appeared in Constitutional Political Economy, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, International Organization, International Security, Journal of Democracy, Political Science Quarterly, Post-Soviet Affairs, and World Politics.
 
McFaul also comments on current Russian and U.S.-Russian affairs, including articles in the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, the Moscow Times, the New Republic, the New York Times, the San Jose Mercury News, the Washington Post, the Washington Times, and the Weekly Standard, as well as television appearances on ABC, BBC, CBS, CNN, Fox News, NBC, and PBS. During the 1995 parliamentary elections in Russia, he worked as senior consultant and commentator for CBS News. During the 1996 presidential election, 1999 parliamentary election, and 2000 presidential election in Russia, he served as a commentator and adviser for CNN. While in Moscow in 1994?95, he also coproduced and appeared in his own television program on democracy for the Russian Television Network (RTR).
 
McFaul was born and raised in Montana. He received his B.A. in international relations and Slavic languages and his M.A. in Slavic and East European studies from Stanford University in 1986. He was awarded a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford where he completed his Ph.D. in international relations in 1991.