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Michael Widner

People

Contact:

Pigott Hall (260), Room 108

Office Hours:

By appointment

Focal Groups:

Research Groups:

Michael Widner

Academic Technology Specialist

Michael Widner is in the joint employ of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages and the Stanford University Libraries, where he works as an Academic Technology Specialist. He works with faculty and their research assistants as consultant or collaborator in DLCL-based digital humanities and instructional technology projects. He also helps organize and present events for the Digital Humanities Focal Group.

He received his Ph.D in English from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. His dissertation, titled "Genre Trouble: Embodied Cognition in Fabliaux, Gawain, and Bury St Edmunds," was supervised by Geraldine Heng and Michael Johnson.

He is also the project director for Bibliopedia, an NEH-funded platform for gathering, displaying, and discussing humanities scholarship that employs linked open data (among many other technical features).

His period specialization is in medieval Britain and France with a focus on romance, fabliaux, and Latin chronicles. He works in Middle English, Old French, Latin, Old English, Python, Javascript, Perl (deprecated), PHP, a few other machine languages, and on the command line.

Prior to entering graduate school, he worked for too many years as a UNIX Systems Administrator at a local ISP that was eventually absorbed by the corporation now known as AT&T. He can set up a LAMP stack in his sleep. He's learning to ride a skateboard and can do a few tricks.

Education

Ph.D., English, University of Texas at Austin
M.A., English, Southern Methodist University
B.A., English & French, University of Texas at Arlington

 

COURSES

DLCL 225 Digital Humanities

The Digital Humanities Focal Group (DHFG) will promote faculty and graduate research in the digital humanities through lectures series, praxis workshops, curriculum, and the identification and development of digital humanities research projects, especially those eligible for grant-funding opportunities. DHFG sponsors a lecture series and convenes regular workshops alternating between praxis and theory. These activities provide fora in which faculty and graduate students can share work in progress, discuss the state of the field, and identify important research that should be shared with the DLCL and broader academic communities. Crucially, the DHFG will promote digital research on underrepresented literatures and cultures to counteract the English-language dominance of much work in the field.

DLCL 225 Digital Humanities

The Digital Humanities Focal Group (DHFG) will promote faculty and graduate research in the digital humanities through lectures series, praxis workshops, curriculum, and the identification and development of digital humanities research projects, especially those eligible for grant-funding opportunities. DHFG sponsors a lecture series and convenes regular workshops alternating between praxis and theory. These activities provide fora in which faculty and graduate students can share work in progress, discuss the state of the field, and identify important research that should be shared with the DLCL and broader academic communities. Crucially, the DHFG will promote digital research on underrepresented literatures and cultures to counteract the English-language dominance of much work in the field.

COMPLIT 338D Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools (COMPLIT 228D)

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.

DLCL 228 Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools (COMPLIT 228D, COMPLIT 338D)

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.

COMPLIT 338D Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools (COMPLIT 228D, DLCL 228)

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.

COMPLIT 228D Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools (COMPLIT 338D)

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.

COMPLIT 228D Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools (COMPLIT 338D, DLCL 228)

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.