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Nariman Skakov

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Building 240, Room 107
Phone: 650 724 3073
nariman.skakov@stanford.edu

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On leave until January 2015

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Sorokin
the Soviet 'Orient'
Khamdamov
Tarkovsky
word and image
Post-Soviet visual arts
Kabakov
Platonov
Bakhtin

Nariman Skakov

Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Nariman Skakov’s trajectory from a peaceful dweller of the wide and wild steppes of Central Asia to an overworked West-Coast academic included an intermediary stop in the UK, where he studied literary theory and cinema. He has a strong interest in Andrei Platonov, the cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky and Rustam Khamdamov, literary theory (Bakhtin and Shklovsky in particular), Moscow conceptualism (Ilya Kabakov, Vladimir Sorokin and Dmitrii Aleksandrovich Prigov), intersections between the textual and the visual, and the Soviet 'Orient'. His first monograph (The Cinema of Tarkovsky: Labyrinths of Space and Time) was published by I.B. Tauris in 2012.

Education

D.Phil., Medieval and Modern Languages, University College, Oxford University, 2009.
M.Phil., European Literature, University College, Oxford University, 2006.
Certificate in Philosophy (Visiting student), Wadham College, Oxford University, 2004.

COURSES

SLAVIC 226 BAKHTIN AND HIS LEGACY

"Quests for my own word are in fact quests for a word that is not my own, a word that is more than myself," writes Mikhail Bakhtin towards the end of his life. It was this ceaseless pursuit of another word that allowed Bakhtin, one of the most distinguished literary critics of the twentieth century, to author several influential literary theory concepts, many of which deal with the ideas of multiplicity, diversity and unfinalizability. The seminar explores these core concepts through close reading of key texts in English and investigates their reverberations in the writings of other thinkers such as Kristeva, de Man and Derrida

SLAVIC 347 Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution (SLAVIC 147)

The Age of Revolution: Readings in Russian Modernist Prose of the 1920-30s: What makes Russian modernist prose special? Or is there anything special about Russian modernist prose? This course aims to answer these questions through close readings of works by Babel, Mandelstam, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha and Bulgakov. Aesthetic issues such as hero, plot, and narrative devices will be addressed with the aid of contemporaneous literary theory (Shklovsky, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin). Novels and theory will be read in English.

SLAVIC 147 Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution (SLAVIC 347)

The Age of Revolution: Readings in Russian Modernist Prose of the 1920-30s: What makes Russian modernist prose special? Or is there anything special about Russian modernist prose? This course aims to answer these questions through close readings of works by Babel, Mandelstam, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha and Bulgakov. Aesthetic issues such as hero, plot, and narrative devices will be addressed with the aid of contemporaneous literary theory (Shklovsky, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin). Novels and theory will be read in English.

SLAVIC 236 The Russian Long Take

"Time flows in a film not by virtue but in defiance of montage-cuts," wrote the great Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky. An exploration of the phenomenon of long take (a single continuous shot which presents `a vision of time') and its aesthetic and philosophical significance to the art of cinema. Key films by cult Russian/Soviet auteurs such as Andrei Tarkovsky, Sergei Paradzhanov and Aleksandr Sokurov will be used as case studies and read through the prism of film theory (Gilles Deleuze, Andre Bazin and Jean Epstein). Taught in English.

PUBLICATIONS