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Russell Berman

People

Contact:

Building 260, Room 201
Phone: 650 723 1069
berman@stanford.edu

Office Hours:

Wednesday 9:00-10:00 and by appointment

Focal Groups:

Affinity links:

history
critical theory
German literature
20th century
19th century

Russell Berman

Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities
Professor of Comparative Literature and German Studies
Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution
Gregory Amadon Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education
Chair of Graduate Studies, German Studies
 

 

Professor Berman joined the Stanford faculty in 1979. In 1982-83 he was a Mellon Faculty Fellow in the Humanities at Harvard, and in 1988-89 he held an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship in Berlin. In 1997 he was awarded the Bundesverdienstkreuz of the Federal Republic of Germany. Professor Berman is the editor of the journal Telos.

Education

1979: Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis
1972: B.A., Harvard University

COURSES

GERMAN 136 Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (GERMAN 336)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.

GERMAN 231 German Literature (1700-1900) (GERMAN 331)

How the literature of the period between 1750 and 1900 gives voice to new conceptions of selfhood and articulates the emergent self understanding of modernity. Responses to unprecedented historical experiences such as the French Revolution and the ensuing wars, changes in the understanding of nature, the crisis of foundations, and the persistence of theological motifs. Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Kleist, Heine, Buchner, Keller, and Fontane. Taught in English, readings in German.

GERMAN 331 German Literature (1700-1900) (GERMAN 231)

How the literature of the period between 1750 and 1900 gives voice to new conceptions of selfhood and articulates the emergent self understanding of modernity. Responses to unprecedented historical experiences such as the French Revolution and the ensuing wars, changes in the understanding of nature, the crisis of foundations, and the persistence of theological motifs. Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Kleist, Heine, Buchner, Keller, and Fontane. Taught in English, readings in German.

GERMAN 336 Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (GERMAN 136)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.

GERMAN 397 Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English. May be repeat for credit

GERMAN 397 Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English. May be repeat for credit

GERMAN 397 Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English. May be repeat for credit

GERMAN 130N Nobel Prize Winners in German Literature

Readings from some of the best German-language authors, including Thomas Mann, Hermann Hesse, Heinrich Boll and Herta Muller. How imaginative literature engages with history, and how great authors address the major questions in politics and philosophy in modern Germany. Taught in German. German language equivalent to high school AP.