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Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

People

Contact:

Pigott Hall 227
650 723 4219
yyb@stanford.edu

Office Hours:

Tuesdays 11:00AM to 1:.00 PM or by appointment

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User is not a member of any group.

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Affinity links:

digital art
queer studies
race
gender
Chicana/o studies
visual culture

Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is interested in Chicana/o cultural studies with an emphasis on gender and queer theory; race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

She is the author of Feminism and the Honor Plays of Lope de Vega (1994), The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherríe Moraga (2001), and co-editor of Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (1991). She has published numerous articles on Chicana/o literature and culture. She teaches Introduction to Chicana/o Studies and a variety of undergraduate courses on literature, art, film/video, theater/performance and everyday cultural practices. Her graduate seminars include topics such as race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

Since 1994, Professor Yarbro-Bejarano has been developing "Chicana Art," a digital archive of images focusing on women artists. Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is chair of the Chicana/o Studies Program in Stanford's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

Education

1976: PhD Spanish, Harvard University
1970: BA with distinction, German, University of Washington
1969: BA summa cum laude, Comparative Literature, University of Washington

COURSES

ILAC 382 Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 280)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.

ILAC 280 Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.

ILAC 280 Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.

ILAC 389E Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations (CSRE 289E, FEMGEN 389E)

Examines major questions and issues that arise in considering race, sex, and gender together. Focus on critical and theoretical texts queering ethnic and diaspora studies and bringing race and ethnicity into queer studies. Close reading of texts in a variety of media negotiating racialized sexualities and sexualized identities. How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and structures of power?

ILAC 287 Queer Raza (CHILATST 120, FEMGEN 120)

Examination of cultural representations by U.S. Latin@s that explore the following questions: How is the mutual constitution of race/sex/class/gender theorized and represented? How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts and what is the function of sex in racial (self)formation? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and other structures of power? How do these texts reinforce or contest stereotypes and the "ideal" bodies of national identity? How do these texts produce queerness as a web of social relations?

PUBLICATIONS