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Graduate Studies

PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS.GRADUATE STUDIES

The departments of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offer several Ph.D. and M.A. programs, as well as co-terminal M.A.s for Stanford undergraduates and Ph.D. minors. Each program is unique and is described on the department sites. Below is a complete table of graduate degrees offered by each department. 

If you are interested in applying for a graduate degree in the DLCL, please click the "Apply Now" button below. For more detailed information about the application process, required materials, and a list of FAQ's, please refer to the Ph.D. Application Details button below. Please note: The admissions deadline for the 2017/18 academic year is December 6, 2016.

Ph.D. Degree Programs

Each program has its own unique features and set of requirements. Please refer to the following pages for detailed descriptions:

Program Ph.D. Ph.D. Minor
Comparative Literature
  • Comparative Literature
  • Comparative Literature
French and Italian
  • French
  • Italian
  • French and Italian
  • French
  • Italian
German Studies
  • German Studies
  • German Studies
Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC)
  • Iberian and Latin American Cultures
  • Iberian and Latin American Cultures
Slavic Languages and Literatures
  • Slavic Languages and Literatures
  • Slavic Languages and Literatures
DLCL
    • Humanities

    The Ph.D. Minor in Humanities

    The Ph.D. minor in Humanities is a sequence of interdisciplinary seminars covering the following five periods: Antiquity, Medieval, Early-Modern, Enlightenment, and Modern. A framing seminar that leads students to reflect on what it means to teach and study the humanities in the 21st century will also be required. The Program is designed to provide students with broad historical knowledge and skills for conducting interdisciplinary research; to prepare students to teach beyond their area of expertise; and to create communities of students and faculty from different departments working on similar periods. Read more about requirements and details in the Stanford Bulletin.

    MA Degree Programs

    The DLCL offers both MA and coterminal MA degrees in the following departments:

    Program MA Degree Coterminal MA
    French and Italian
    • French
    • French
    • Italian
    German Studies
    • German Studies
    • German Studies
    Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC)
    • Iberian and Latin American Cultures
    • Iberian and Latin American Cultures
    Slavic Languages and Literatures
    • Slavic Languages and Literatures
    • Slavic Languages and Literatures

     

    Certificate in Language Program Management

    Excellent programs in contemporary foreign language teaching preparation entail a knowledge base that has grown over the past thirty years, rooted in data from an explosion of linguistic as well as applied linguistic research. In tandem with the language center's primary focus on learning research and theory, which graduate students explore in the teaching preparation program, the Language Program Management certificate will focus on developing the professional leadership and academic skills necessary for a career that includes the coordination and management of language learning. The program funds summer internships which enable the completion of a certificate in Language Program Management and are intended to help Stanford graduate students prepare themselves for such work in complement to their literary studies. Find out more information here

    DLCL FILM SERIES WINTER 2017: BAD EDUCATION

    Join us this quarter for our exploration of the theme "Bad Education," which will look at the representation of school, schooling, indoctrination, and rebellion in international film. Through this quarter's films we hope to explore the myriad meanings of "education" and its effects on behaviour.  We will look at the history of what and how we learn, and the consequences of what is eaten, absorned or rejected. To approach this theme we will examine a variety of film genres including art house, satire, and the Hollywood coming-of-age story, in order to compare the representation of learning environments across schools of cinema, different film technologies, and film history. Please be aware that some films may include graphic or disturbing content. Viewers are advised to familiarize themselves with the films' content before viewing.

     

    All films will be shown on WEDNESDAY evenings from 6:30pm - 9:00pm in room 320-105.

     

    There will be a general introduction to each film, and each screening will be followed by an opportunity for discussion.

     

    Admission is free and open to the public and audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussions following the films. Please also note that grades for this course are entirely dependent on attendance, which is taken at the end of each screening. Enrolled students MUST attend AT LEAST SEVEN screenings in order to obtain credit. May be repeat for credit.

     

    January 11: Rushmore, Wes Anderson (1998)

    January 18: Skirt Day, Jean-Paul Lillienfeld (2008).

    January 25: The 400 Blows, François Truffaut (1959).

    February 1: A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick (1971).

    February 8: Being There, Hal Ashby (1979)

    February 15: The Club, Pablo Larraín (2015)

    February 22: Sansho the Bailiff, Kenji Mizoguchi (1954)

    March 1: The White Ribbon, Michael Haneke (2009)

    March 8:  Black Bread, Agustí Villaronga (2010)

    March 15: Election, Alexander Payne (1999)

     

    Contact

    Newsha Firoozye Davis  Student Affairs Manager
    Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260 Rm. 127 Stanford, CA 94305-2005